The engagement Graph

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

Maarten Vanneste, Meeting Design Institute

Abstract 

There is a significant difference between a real experience and watching it on a small screen alone. Between these two extremes, there lies a whole range of online/virtual and Hybrid meeting formats. Each of these come with an increasing level of engagement which needs to be quantified in the coming years. This paper is an essay putting time and place in a graph that shows the different formats in a qualitative position of lower or higher engagement… Time and place of the real meeting (same time & same place) versus the engagement levels in other formats of ‘presentation consumption’ or ‘people meeting’. (…) Read more

Meetings, fast and slow: How efficient is decision-making in social movement organizations?

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

Hans Jonas Gunzelmann, Scuola Normale Superiore (Institute of Human and Social Sciences)

Abstract:

Social movement organizations (SMOs) embrace democratic modes of decision-making in their meetings, using either consensus or majority voting. Unlike in bureaucratic organizations, no individual has the power to impose a decision; all members participate in the process. For a long time, it has been common sense in organizational studies that horizontal decision-making leads to endless discussion, fights among participants, and ineffective use of resources. This reflects the long shadow of Max Weber and his claim that bureaucratic organizations produce the most efficient results. (…) Read more

The interactional use of sticky notes in business meetings and workshops

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

Mie Femø Nielsen, University of Copenhagen (Department of Nordic Studies and Linguistics)

Abstract:

Sticky notes were invented by mistake by 3M. Dr. Spencer Silver accidentally created a “low-tack,” reusable, pressure-sensitive adhesive in 1968 when he was working on developing a super-strong adhesive. He promoted his “solution without a problem” within 3M both informally and through seminars and in 1974 his colleague, Art Fry, came up with the idea of using the adhesive to anchor his bookmark in his hymnbook and then developed the idea further with his team. (…) Read more

Process push-back: A grounded practical theory for facilitators facing challenges to the meeting design

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

Leah Sprain, University of Colorado Boulder (Communication)

Abstract 
Within the meetings literature, ‘facilitator challenges’ often references difficult situations that facilitators must navigate, such has dominating participants, minimal participation, disrespect, and conflict. This paper takes on a related type of facilitator challenge: moments when participants challenge the meeting design or group process implemented by the facilitator. In, particular, I consider process push-back within public meetings with deliberative designs where a facilitator guides a small group of six to nine participants in deliberative discussion (Gastil & Black, 2008). Rather than presume that these challenges are inappropriate or out of line, this paper turns to social interaction during actual meetings to develop practical theory for handling process push-back given the potential that such push-back may actually be an important form of furthering democratic values. (…) Read more

Multimodal (inter)action in technology-mediated business meetings

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

Tuire Oittinen, University of Jyväskylä (Department of language and communication studies)

Abstract 
International business meetings today include the frequent use of modern technologies to enable collaboration between distributed workgroups. Participation in technology-mediated (i.e. distant) meetings involves the management of three interactional spaces: i.e. official meeting space, local space and other (virtual) spaces (Wasson, 2006). This raises a practical problem of how to create and sustain shared orientation to the tasks at hand and specific meeting items (e.g. openings, closings, topic-transitions). In face-to-face meetings embodied resources, like the gaze and gesture, along with material objects are frequently used to secure participation and accomplish alignment with others (e.g. (…) Read more

‘All we do is meetings around here’ reaching agreement in problem solving meeting talk

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

Kyoungmi Kim, University of Warwick (Centre for Applied Linguistics)
Jo Angouri, University of Warwick (Applied Linguistics)

Abstract 
Meetings play a central role in any professional setting, commonly seen as the organisation’s epitome and the context where new knowledge emerges, professional identities are negotiated and practices are brought to scrutiny. The type and function of meetings varies but they are easily recognisable by their participants. In this paper we are particularly interested in meetings employees define as having a primarily problem solving function and we distinguish between formal and informal events. (…) Read more

Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS) changes the equation for meeting intense workflows – Traditional setups V.S. GDSS supported workflows – A Case Study

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

Pierre Wettergren, CCGEurope (Chalmers Industrial Technology)

Abstract 
This case study is based on a risk assessment work conducted in a Swedish governmental organisation. This organisation had at the time 5’500 employees and a yearly revenue of 25 billion Swedish kronor. The risk assessment was performed by Clever Collaboration Group, experts in virtually supported work flows mainly using GDSS. In this Study a comparison was made by the traditional way of working with the possibilities that virtually supported workshops and work flows ads.
Our findings show that the total calendar time from initiation to delivered and approved Risk Assessment Report changed from 95 days to 32 days (time), the quality improved from 40% accuracy and completeness to 97% (Quality), and the total cost including travels and cost of staff and consultants decreased from €175´000 to €31’000 (Economy of Effort). (…) Read more

The Role of Network Positions and Team Interaction Processes on Initial Trust Formation in Meetings

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

Lisa Handke, Technische Universität Braunschweig (Industrial/Organizational and Social Psychology)

Abstract 
Due to a lack of contextual cues and socio-emotional interactions, virtual teams depend on the development of swift trust (e.g., Brahm & Kunze, 2012; Jarvenpaa & Leidner, 1999). Swift trust, in turn, is based on individual expectations which are tested and proven through actions at early stages of team development (Meyerson, Weick, & Kramer, 1996). Furthermore, initial trust formation strongly relies on attribution processes. Central to attributions of trustworthiness is perceived ability (Mayer, Davis, & Schoorman, 1995). Competence, i.e. (…) Read more

Performing and documenting patient-centred collaboration during meetings

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

Katarina Jacobsson, Lund University (Social Work)

Abstract 
During the last decade the Swedish authorities’ appeal for collaboration between and within different welfare institutions has been particularly accentuated through various efforts to standardize and formalize collaboration and co-ordination. Human service workers from various agencies (eg. psychiatry, the social services, and the employment office) are required to arrange meetings regarding individual clients or patients where they draw up a plan, stating “who do what and when”. In this paper, I examine one such meeting where ten professionals come together with Carl, a young patient at a closed psychiatric unit, in order to plan Carl’s future while they simultaneously fill out the form “Co-ordinated Treatment Plan” (CTP). (…) Read more

Suspension practices: how change occurs in strategy workshops

The Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

This paper belongs to Thematic Session 3 of the Gothenburg Meeting Science Symposium

David Seidl, University of Zurich (Department of Business Administration)

Abstract 
Existing research suggests that established structures and routines are suspended during strategy workshops, enabling critical reflection and facilitating the emergence of new ideas. This paper extends this line of research by examining the specific mechanisms through which suspension in strategy workshop is achieved. Drawing on an in-depth, longitudinal case study of a series of strategy workshops within a firm, we show that suspension is actively created through distinctive practices. These suspension practices operate in two ways. First, they inhibit established practices and secondly they act to disrupt secondary practices that reinforce or defend the established practices. (…) Read more